The Everett Scoreboard, SCG circa 1930

Fairfax Media’s Money supplement recently published a First XI of stocks and illustrated the story with a variation of the Sydney Cricket Ground scoreboard. Naturally, our eyes were drawn to the centre of the illustration, where we were disappointed to learn that Scoreboard Pressure didn’t rate a mention up there with the big hitters. But what names were actually in the middle of the scoreboard  before it was digitally altered?

The New South Wales score is at least 7/669, but the seven dismissed batsmen have only scored 276. That leaves 400 runs up for grabs. We’re betting a bloke called Bradman might have been on his way to scoring 452 not out against Queensland.

Much more important though, is the name Everett, seventh batsmen dismissed. Scoreboard Pressure’s co-founder/CEO/managing director is West Australian left-arm swing bowler Les Everett. The Everett playing for New South Wales over 80 years ago is, we think, Charles Samuel (Sam) Everett,  a right-arm fast bowler who played 45 Sheffield Shield games for New South Wales between 1921 and 1930. He took 134 wickets, with best figures of 6/23. Other Everetts to play Shield cricket were Dudley (WA, one game, 1935-36, out for a duck) and James Seabrook (WA , 1909/10, one game, batting average 6.5).

Les Everett played his best cricket for Corrigin in the Bruce Rock Narambeen   Cricket Association with best figures of 9/37 vs Babakin at Corrigin on 23 December 1978. On the morning of the game he drove 225km from Perth to Corrigin (he was in Corrigin on a teaching stint). After the game he hopped back into his Corolla and drove 447km to Boulder and a family Christmas. He was a wonderfully inept right handed batsman reaching 50 once in about 30 seasons of competitive cricket. 

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James Seabrook (Jim) Everett played football for West Perth and is credited as the first to represent WA in both cricket and football. He was a premiership player for West Perth in 1901 and 1905. We don’t know if he is related to Les.

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